Latimer

Latimer add

The brief was to create three inner-city Christchurch homes, that felt more like houses, breaking away from the typical one- and two-bedroom city units you traditionally spy in the central city. Kelly Rush of Krush Architecture exceeded expectations. Not only designing three modern, light and bright, high-spec townhouses, he was also awarded the 2018 Residential Multi-Unit Dwelling Architectural Design Award for his efforts.

Concrete was the material of choice throughout the project. A concrete first floor supports concrete precast panels finished with black oxide and a vertical recessed texture. The precast panels are contrasted against dark stained vertical cedar cladding and a custom folded matte black façade panel.

Kelly says the choice of concrete was very important to the success of the project.

“Using a concrete floor allowed the design to have a three-metre cantilevered deck that appears to fly towards Latimer square, making you feel like you are in the park. Concrete was also close to the client’s heart who has a background in commercial construction,” says Rush.

Judges of the ADNZ | Resene Architectural Design Awards also appreciated the way concrete was used to give the complex a sense of permanence.

“Durable materials are assembled in a manner that will ensure these buildings will sit well in this central Christchurch context for years to come,” they said.

Walking in through the front door of these two-story homes, you are immediately greeted with space and light. A concrete stair that cantilevers off the wall leads you up to the first floor living spaces. To give the units a sense of volume, both the ground and first floors have 2.7m ceiling heights with impressive 2.6m glazing, it also adds style and a contemporary feel to the project.

Judges applauded the way Rush used volume to create a sense of space.

“The scale of the tenancies and the spaces within are generous, while the height of the building demonstrates consideration for neighbouring buildings in that it allows those located behind, visual access to the park beyond,” said the judges.

ADNZ CEO Astrid Andersen said Rush had created a desirable home that could be an inner-city sanctuary for a host of demographics.

“A constant challenge is how to create inner-city homes that work for families as well as professionals and couples etc. These groups have different needs and wants, but families can be the hardest to please. In general, most want a home for their children that is well located, but that also gives them a sense of space. These apartments by Kelly tick many boxes. They are light filled, modern for the modern family, you can see the park and they have three bedrooms which enables a family of four to live comfortably. Kelly has executed a challenging brief expertly. Well done.”